Cynthia M. Sexton, Transition Consultant
 Cynthia M. Sexton, Transition Consultant   

Journal entries...

Quotes are rich so you will find them here, this also is a placeholder for my thoughts as well. I like pausing in the middle of the day or late at night to reflect, it nourishes my soul.

 

~Recently thoughts about respect have flooded my heart. When disrespected -be patient. Someone before you is hurting be it a driver, clerk, friend -just forgive it. The only issue to reflect upon is the condition of your resilience. Annoyance is God's way of offering us an internal skills check up. ~Cms,

 

 

Here is a Journal Entry from my old website

February 10th, 2011

 

We are suppose to be patient, kind, thoughtful, forgiving, responsible, attentive, loving, caring, gentle, and did I mention forgiving...

There are times in life when we find ourselves unable to forgive someone who has done something to us. What does it mean when we can’t forgive? The answer is too lengthy for this quick entry, but I’ll speak to this issue as clearly as I can.

We are suppose to forgive those that have wronged us eventually. This has been laid out for us time and time again. However, we often end up feeling guilty when we find ourselves holding negative feelings toward someone who has caused us to feel hurt. We are encouraged to “let go and let God”, to “turn the other cheek”, or to “write it all out in a journal”. All good suggestions on how to find healing from our inner pain. Just because it’s the right thing to do does not mean we are finished processing our experience. It is as if healing should be placed on a time-table. It cannot be. And, to quickly get rid of it because it feels bad is really the wrong thing to do. Instead, we must hold this sacred fire and burn, and in so doing have what is less than who we really are melt away. Eventually, it does. Like a butterfly once captive in her cocoon of limitation, we are set free to be more than what we once were. 

To let go before we have extracted all that we can from what we’ve experienced no matter how minor or horrible it might have been is to be at risk of denying ourselves the precious inner learning just made available. It can take day, weeks, months, years, or decades. The length of time does not matter. 

This is what is meant by us when we say “I’m not ready!” There is no time-frame that can be set for this type of inner-work. It will happen when we have integrated all that can be extracted from this special kind of life lesson. In the end we say, “While I don’t ever want to go through anything like that again, it was the best thing that happened to me. It changed my life for the better forever.” Such is the power of healing that comes from life’s most difficult challenges we’ve each encountered. 

To awaken to the need for change is to heal.  To become more conscious of who we really are, what we really need, and what we need to do to heal our lives, and ourselves is the whole point of adversity entering our lives. While not one of us will seek it -- when adversity once again finds us and knocks upon our door, if we’ve learned from before we will open that door wide and say... “Oh it’s You. You who only comes to visit when it’s time for transformation, for real change. Come-in, I knew You’d come back! Thank you for not leaving me to live in this mediocrity.” 

“All greatness of character is dependent on individuality. The man who has no other existence than that which he partakes in common with all around him, will never have any other than an existence of mediocrity.” ~James F. Cooper

No, we do not forget what has happened to us that hurt, but it does become a dim memory when we have extracted all of the Light it carried to us. It becomes part of our journey, part of our learning, and part of our compassion. This is the essence of true forgiveness. 

More soon ~ Cynthia

 

Contact Me...

Cynthia M. Sexton
8910 Montgomery Ave
Chevy Chase,MD 20815-4704


Phone:

301 654-3255 301 654-3255

E-mail: cynthia@cynthiasexton.com

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